Australian Screen Production,
Education & Research Association

Established in 2004, ASPERA is the peak discipline body of Australian tertiary institutions teaching and researching film, video, television and new media as screen based production practices. Subscribe to our email list for updates on our research and annual conference:

Latest News & Research

CFP: Gender and the Screenplay: Processes, Practices, Perspectives

A special issue of Networking Knowledge: Journal of the MeCCSA Postgraduate Network

eds. Louise Sawtell and Stayci Taylor (RMIT University, Melbourne)

While plenty has been written about gender representation on screen, much less has been written about gender in regards to screenplays. Emerging scholarly research around screenwriting practice often focuses on questions of the craft – is screenwriting a technical or creative act? – and whether or not the screenplay’s only destiny is to disappear into the film (Maras 1999). Read

CALL FOR PAPERS EXTENSION: A one-day symposium on The Films of Ivan Sen

University of Canberra, Friday 10 July 2015

Internationally acclaimed filmmaker Ivan Sen has written and directed a number of feature films including Beneath Clouds and Mystery Road, as well as Loveland, a sci-fi romance currently under-development. He is recognised for his low budget, minimal crew approach to filmmaking as well as his short films and documentaries. By highlighting the work of Ivan Sen, and showcasing his trajectory as an artist, the symposium will explore his career to date and contribute to the appreciation and knowledge of Australian cinema. Read

Call for Papers: Female Authorship in Contemporary Documentary Media

In conjunction with women’s increasing claim to equal societal rights and vocalisation on a global scale, women have also taken centre stage in the documentation of contemporary issues.
Of course, this is not a new phenomenon per se; in terms of culture and scholarship women have been seeking to establish myriad voices and perspectives on issues of gender, politics, history and selfhood throughout the various waves of feminism.

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ASPERA Creative Practice Research Seed Grant deadline

The ASPERA Executive reminds you the ASPERA Creative Practice Research Seed Grant deadline for submissions is May 22, 2015. Please send your application using the supplied pro forma available here on or before this date.

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Sightlines

With the support of ASPERA, Sightlines: Filmmaking in the Academy was a film festival/conference held at RMIT University in November 2014. A range of participants were asked to respond to the question: do you think academic filmmaking needs written text to count as research? Here are their responses, filmed and edited by Nicholas Hansen.

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Walking on the Dark Side: Images, Techniques and Themes in Student Short Films

Abstract

When it comes time for Australian film students to produce their major projects, they are usually given complete freedom to choose their topics. Having been a lecturer involved with student short film production for over ten years, I have often been struck by the recurring images and themes that tend to emerge.

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Creative Screen Labour: Capital Reciprocity in 
Micro-Budget Corporate Documentary

Abstract

Screen production is often described as ‘a love project’ when the film is made on a micro-budget, using volunteer labour and complex reciprocal arrangements to ensure it is completed to a professional standard. This research explores what drives a crew member work unpaid on a friend’s film.

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Database Documentaries: New Documentary Practices in Emergent Narrative Spaces and the Classroom

Abstract

The development of sophisticated portable media tools, social media applications and high-speed communication networks has arguably changed our understanding of the documentary form. Database documentaries offer filmmakers and audiences new ways to produce and/or experience a wide range of narrative forms.

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Researching ‘The Shoot Out Filmmaking Festival’ by Targeting Creativity

Abstract

The Shoot Out 24 Hour Filmmaking Festival began in Newcastle in 1999 and ran annually until 2008. The premise was that films had to be made in a 24-hour period and to authenticate the festival timeframe each film included specific items filmed at local sites. In some years the festival attracted up to 180 film crews, who annually swarmed the streets of Newcastle to film in specified locations, in a linear order to comply with another rule: ‘in-camera’ editing.

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Development of a University Feature Film 
Production Model

Abstract

This paper presents one possible model for constructing a university feature film production course. This approach was developed through my Screen Production PhD (Young 2013), where I researched my role as a feature producer on Double Happiness Uranium (2013).

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Creative Practices Research Methodology Bibliography

UTS: Communication, Creative Practices Group Creative Practices Research Methodology Bibliography (144kb PDF) by Marie McKenzie.

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The Anonymous Actor – Ethics and Screen Production Research

Abstract

All research in Australian universities involving human participants needs approval from human research ethics committees, who make judgments consistent with accepted ethical principles that have recently been captured in the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007). Making a film as an academic research project is a relatively recent phenomenon and there are apparent contradictions between the requirements for ethics approval and the accepted practice of screen production.

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Creative practice as a research tool: benefits and pitfalls

Abstract

In this paper I examine how my creative practice as a filmmaker prepared me for academia. I argue that the rigors of filmmaking are transferable to other disciplines.

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Applying creativity theories to a documentary filmmaker’s practice

Abstract

The generally accepted definition for a documentary is ‘the creative treatment of actuality’ (Grierson, 1933, p. 8). Documentary scholars have rigorously discussed and dissected, the meaning that Grierson may have intended for this phrase, (Corner, 1996; Higson, 1995; Montagu, 1964; Winston, 1995). While the terms ‘treatment’ and ‘actuality’ have been debated and defined, interpretations of creativity that cite psychological and socio-cultural creativity research (Csikszentmihalyi, 1996; Sawyer, 2006; Sternberg, 1988, 1999) do not appear in the literature to date.

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A Good Take: The process as a site for screen production research

Abstract

Screen production as an academic research discipline has struggled to establish itself, both within the broader higher education sector and in relation to the film and television industry. The lack of conceptual and analytical frameworks with which to understand screen production and which resonate with the experience of professional practitioners contributes to this.

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Encouraging Critical Practice in Media Students: The Digital Dossier Initiative

Abstract

In a fluid and rapidly changing media landscape, today’s screen production students more than ever require skills in ‘critical practice’ to enable them to play leading roles in tomorrow’s screen culture and industries. It is extremely difficult to find pedagogical approaches that facilitate student learning of creative and technical production skills and at the same time place these within a critical and theoretical context that encourages the questioning of and experimentation with existing production and aesthetic paradigms.

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Talking With Dinosaurs? Some reflections on the role of the documentary in screen production education

Abstract

This paper reflects on the role of the documentary in screen production education and the implications for Australian screen educators of current debates about the form’s place in the audiovisual schedule.

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Writing and Improvising the Digital Essay Film: the Boot Cake

Abstract

This paper reflects on the process of writing and producing the author’s feature- length non-fiction film about Chaplin imitators in India: The Boot Cake. (www.thebootcake.com) It aims to contribute to debate about 1. innovative screen production processes and aesthetics, and 2. the value accorded screen practice research in universities. Writing and Improvising the Digital Essay Film investigates how semi-structured improvisations and collaborations might provide models for the film making process in a digital environment.

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A Safety Induction ‘Blue Card’ for the film, television and new media industry in Queensland and Australia

Abstract

Failures to manage occupational risk competently and comply with occupational health and safety (OHS) legislation can jeopardise the attainment of business objectives, limit or negate profits, and inhibit an entities sustainability. Enterprises and individuals failing to manage occupational risk appropriately may also incur financial or custodial penalties. Some businesses may even be curtailed as a result of enforced closure or costly and ongoing litigation.

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